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News posted by antirez

Some fun with Redis Cluster testing

antirez 1707 days ago.
One of the steps to reach the goal of providing a "testable" Redis Cluster experience to users within a few weeks, is some serious testing that goes over the usual "I'm running 3 nodes in my macbook, it works". Finally this is possible, since Redis Cluster entered into the "refinements" stage, and most of the system design and implementation is in its final form already.

In order to perform some testing I assembled an environment like that:

* Hardware: 6 real computers: 2 macbook pro, 2 macbook air, 1 Linux desktop, 1 Linux tiny laptop called EEEpc running with a single core at 800Mhz.

Redis as AP system, reloaded

antirez 1713 days ago.
So finally something really good happened from the Redis criticism thread.

At the end of the work day I was reading about Redis as AP and merge operations on Twitter. At the same time I was having a private email exchange with Alexis Richardson (from RabbitMQ, and, my boss). Alexis at some point proposed that perhaps a way to improve safety was to asynchronously ACK the client about what commands actually were not received so that the client could retry. This seemed a lot of efforts in the client side, but somewhat totally opened my view on the matter.

The Redis criticism thread

antirez 1715 days ago.
A few days ago I tried to do an experiment by running some kind of “call for critiques” in the Redis mailing list:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/redis-db/Oazt2k7Lzz4

The thread has reached 89 posts so far, probably one of the biggest threads in the history of the Redis google group.
The main idea was that critiques are a mix of pointless attacks, and truth, so to extract the truth from critiques can be a good exercise, it means to have some seed idea for future improvements from the part of the population that is not using or is not happy with your system.

WAIT: synchronous replication for Redis

antirez 1720 days ago.
Redis unstable has a new command called "WAIT". Such a simple name, is indeed the incarnation of a simple feature consisting of less than 200 lines of code, but providing an interesting way to change the default behavior of Redis replication.

The feature was extremely easy to implement because of previous work made. WAIT was basically a direct consequence of the new Redis replication design (that started with Redis 2.8). The feature itself is in a form that respects the design of Redis, so it is relatively different from other implementations of synchronous replication, both at API level, and from the point of view of the degree of consistency it is able to ensure.

Blog lost and recovered in 30 minutes

antirez 1723 days ago.
Yesterday I lost all my blog data in a rather funny way. When I installed this new blog engine, that is basically a Lamer News slightly modified to serve as a blog, I spinned a Redis instance manually with persistence *disabled* just to see if it was working and test it a bit.

I just started a screen instance, and run something like ./redis-server --port 10000. Since this is equivalent to an empty config file with just "port 10000" inside I was running no disk backed at all.

Since Redis very rarely crashes, guess what, after more than one year it was still running inside the screen session, and I totally forgot that it was running like that, happily writing controversial posts in my blog. Yesterday my server was under attack. This caused an higher then normal load, and Linode rebooted the instance. As a result my blog was gone.

The fight against sexism is not a free pass

antirez 1724 days ago.
Today Joyent wrote a blog post in the company blog about an issue that started with this pull request in the libuv project: https://github.com/joyent/libuv/pull/1015#issuecomment-29538615

Basically the developer Ben Noordhuis rejected a pull request involving a change in the documentation to use gender-neutral form instead of “him”. Joyent replied with this incredible post: http://www.joyent.com/blog/the-power-of-a-pronoun.

In the blog post you can read:

“But while Isaac is a Joyent employee, Ben is not—and if he had been, he wouldn't be as of this morning: to reject a pull request that eliminates a gendered pronoun on the principle that pronouns should in fact be gendered would constitute a fireable offense for me and for Joyent.”

Finally Redis collections are iterable

antirez 1759 days ago.
Redis API for data access is usually limited, but very direct and straightforward.

It is limited because it only allows to access data in a natural way, that is, in a data structure obvious way. Sorted sets are easy to access by score ranges, while hashes by field name, and so forth.
This API “way” has profound effects on what Redis is and how users organize data into it, because an API that is data-obvious means fast operations, less code and less bugs in the implementation, but especially forcing the application layer to make meaningful choices: the database as a system in which you are responsible of organizing data in a way that makes sense in your application, versus a database as a magical object where you put data inside, and then it will be able to fetch and organize data for you in any format.

New Redis Cluster meta-data handling

antirez 1790 days ago.
This blog post describes the new algorithm used in Redis Cluster in order to propagate and update metadata, that is hopefully significantly safer than the previous algorithm used. The Redis Cluster specification was not yet updated, as I'm rewriting it from scratch, so this blog post serves as a first way to share the algorithm with the community.

Let's start with the problem to solve. Redis Cluster uses a master - slave design in order to recover from nodes failures. The key space is partitioned across the different masters in the cluster, using a concept that we call "hash slots". Basically every key is hashed into a number between 0 and 16383. If a given key hashes to 15, it means it is in the hash slot number 15. These 16k hash slots are split among the different masters.

English has been my pain for 15 years

antirez 1815 days ago.
Paul Graham managed to put a very important question, the one of the English language as a requirement for IT workers, in the attention zone of news sites and software developers [1]. It was a controversial matter as he referred to "foreign accents" and the internet is full of people that are just waiting to overreact, but this is the least interesting part of the question, so I'll skip that part. The important part is, no one talks about the "English problem" usually, and I always felt a bit alone in that side, like if it was a problem only affecting me, so in this blog post I want to share my experience about English.

Twilio incident and Redis

antirez 1855 days ago.
Twilio just released a post mortem about an incident that caused issues with the billing system:

http://www.twilio.com/blog/2013/07/billing-incident-post-mortem.html

The problem was about a Redis server, since Twilio is using Redis to store the in-flight account balances, in a master-slaves setup, with multiple slaves in different data centers for obvious availability and data safety concerns.

This is a short analysis of the incident, what Twilio can do and what Redis can do to avoid this kind of issues.
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