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News posted by antirez

Generating unique IDs: an easy and reliable way

antirez 1004 days ago.
Two days ago Mike Malone published an interesting post on Medium about the V8 implementation of Math.random(), and how weak is the quality of the PRNG used: http://bit.ly/1SPDraN.

The post was one of the top news on Hacker News today. It’s pretty clear and informative from the point of view of how Math.random() is broken and how should be fixed, so I’ve nothing to add to the matter itself. But since the author discovered the weakness of the PRNG in the context of generating large probably-non-colliding IDs, I want to share with you an alternative that I used multiple times in the past, which is fast and extremely reliable.

6 years of commit visualized

antirez 1005 days ago.
Today I was curious about plotting all the Redis commits we have on Git, which are 90% of all the Redis commits. There was just an initial period where I used SVN but switched very soon.

Full size image here: http://antirez.com/misc/commitsvis.png



Each commit is a rectangle. The height is the number of affected lines (a logarithmic scale is used). The gray labels show release tags.

There are little surprises since the amount of commit remained pretty much the same over the time, however now that we no longer backport features back into 3.0 and future releases, the rate at which new patchlevel versions are released diminished.

Recent improvements to Redis Lua scripting

antirez 1006 days ago.
Lua scripting is probably the most successful Redis feature, among the ones introduced when Redis was already pretty popular: no surprise that a few of the things users really want are about scripting. The following two features were suggested multiple times over the last two years, and many people tried to focus my attention into one or the other during the Redis developers meeting, a few weeks ago.

1. A proper debugger for Redis Lua scripts.
2. Replication, and storage on the AOF, of Lua scripts as a set of write commands materializing the *effects* of the script, instead of replicating the script itself as we normally do.

A few things about Redis security

antirez 1022 days ago.
IMPORTANT EDIT: Redis 3.2 security improved by implementing protected mode. You can find the details about it here: https://www.reddit.com/r/redis/comments/3zv85m/new_security_feature_redis_protected_mode/

From time to time I get security reports about Redis. It’s good to get reports, but it’s odd that what I get is usually about things like Lua sandbox escaping, insecure temporary file creation, and similar issues, in a software which is designed (as we explain in our security page here http://redis.io/topics/security) to be totally insecure if exposed to the outside world.

Moving the Redis community on Reddit

antirez 1034 days ago.
I’m just back from the Redis Dev meeting 2015. We spent two incredible days talking about Redis internals in many different ways. However while I’m waiting to receive private notes from other attenders, in order to summarize in a blog post what happened and what were the most important ideas exposed during the meetings, I’m going to touch a different topic here. I took the non trivial decision to move the Redis mailing list, consisting of 6700 members, to Reddit.

This looks like a crazy ideas probably in some way, and “to move” is probably not the right verb, since the ML will still exist. However it will only be used in order to receive announcements of new releases, critical informations like security related ones, and from time to time, links to very important discussions that are happening on Reddit.

Clarifications about Redis and Memcached

antirez 1060 days ago.
If you know me, you know I’m not the kind of guy that considers competing products a bad thing. I actually love the users to have choices, so I rarely do anything like comparing Redis with other technologies.
However it is also true that in order to pick the right solution users must be correctly informed.

This post was triggered by reading a blog post published by Mike Perham, that you may know as the author of a popular library called Sidekiq, that happens to use Redis as backend. So I would not consider Mike a person which is “against” Redis at all. Yet in his blog post that you can find at the URL http://www.mikeperham.com/2015/09/24/storing-data-with-redis/ he states that, for caching, “you should probably use Memcached instead [of Redis]”. So Mike simply really believes Redis is not good for caching, and he arguments his thesis in this way:

Lazy Redis is better Redis

antirez 1060 days ago.
Everybody knows Redis is single threaded. The best informed ones will tell you that, actually, Redis is *kinda* single threaded, since there are threads in order to perform certain slow operations on disk. So far threaded operations were so focused on I/O that our small library to perform asynchronous tasks on a different thread was called bio.c: Background I/O, basically.

However some time ago I opened an issue where I promised a new Redis feature that many wanted, me included, called “lazy free”. The original issue is here: https://github.com/antirez/redis/issues/1748.

About Redis Sets memory efficiency

antirez 1089 days ago.
Yesterday Amplitude published an article about scaling analytics, in the context of using the Set data type. The blog post is here: https://amplitude.com/blog/2015/08/25/scaling-analytics-at-amplitude/

On Hacker News people asked why not using Redis instead: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=10118413 

Amplitude developers have their set of reasons for not using Redis, and in general if you have a very specific problem and want to scale it in the best possible way, it makes sense to implement your vertical solution. I’m not adverse to reinventing the wheel, you want your very specific wheel sometimes, that a general purpose system may not be able to provide. Moreover creating your solution gives you control on what you did, boosts your creativity and your confidence in what you, as a developer can do, makes you able to debug whatever bug may arise in the future without external help.

Thanks Pivotal, Hello Redis Labs

antirez 1133 days ago.
I consider myself very lucky for contributing to the open source. For me OSS software is not just a license: it means transparency in the development process, choices that are only taken in order to improve software from the point of view of the users, documentation that attempts to cover everything, and simple, understandable systems. The Redis community had the privilege of finding in Pivotal, and VMware before, a company that thinks at open source in the same way as we, the community of developers, think of it.

Commit messages are not titles

antirez 1155 days ago.
Nor subjects, for what matters. Everybody will tell you to don't add a dot at the end of the first line of a commit message. I followed the advice for some time, but I'll stop today, because I don't believe commit messages are titles or subjects. They are synopsis of the meaning of the change operated by the commit, so they are small sentences. The sentence can be later augmented with more details in the next lines of the commit message, however many times there is *no* body, there is just the first line. How many emails or articles you see with just the subject or the title? Very little, I guess. So for me it is like:
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